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? is there facial recognition technology? or do they have to rely on people saying i know that guy? >> there is facial recognition technology, but to tell you the truth, honestly, when i was in a little kid i met a hero detective who solved a very tough case involving a sniper and i said how did you do it? and he wrote something that i can't repeat on the air, but it was basically knock on doors and get off of your derriere. facial recognition can only take you so far. i think it will be a member of the public. the reporting has been extraordinary, i think cnn, you guys, fox and msnbc have really done a very good job. and part of that is getting evidence in there that they think is important but when strung together it will come together, but is a very human intensive process. all of the photographs and video, really have to go through a set of eyes not a computer. >> michael: yeah, and that's amazing, and of course that's why we had you on brian, to talk about exactly how good of job we have done covering this story. but we really appreciate your input, beca
personnel along our borders as well as utilization of proven surveillance technology along the highest traffic areas across the southwest border. reducing wait times at the ports of entry the budget requests 35rks00 port officers. to scurel maritime borders the budget invests in coast guard assets, including the seven national security cutter and fast response cutters. the bum continues the department's focus on smart enforcement of our country's immigration laws. it supports the administration's effort to focus the enforcement system on safety threats and the integrity of the immigration system through childhood arrivals and greater use of rosecutor yull discretion. we support more cost effective initiatives of secure communities. e budget invests in monitory compliance to work sight related laws. while continuing to support alternatives to the tension, detention reform and immigrant immigration efforts. comprehensive immigration reform will help us build on these efforts and strengthen boarder security by enabling d.h.s. while focusing on criminals, human smallingers and those who im
and missiles and stealth technology and ability to fight supersonic speeds. it may well be the way it has been designed to evade budget cutters in washington. more, sunday at 8:00 and c- span's "q&a". came into the white house. she was a 47-year-old lady who hated politics. thewas deeply depressed at death of her last surviving son. especially under the terrible circumstances in which she died. friends,ot have many unfortunately she had a wonderful family who kept her going. there always seem to be somebody there. i do not think he read very much. she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. with that intellect and wonderful education, it seemed wasted in some way. >> the conversation on jayne pearce, the life of the 14th president, is now available on our web site. tune in monday for our next program on the first lady, mary todd lincoln. >> this documentary comes from zachary cohen of the adele davis academy in sandy springs, georgia. his message to the president looks at funding for education. it is a second prize-winning video in this year's c-span studentcam competition. >> this is
and the military side. i've constantly tried to improve how we address the need for the next generation technology, public-private cooperation and ensuring that we have the price personnel to counter this 21st century cyberthreat. however, i am uncompromising in safeguarding the rights of our citizens and i will never sacrifice our civil liberties for unneeded intrusion. to this end, the amendment i am offering today would strengthen existing provisions in the bill to include the privacy officer and the officer for civil rights and civil liberties of the department of homeland security askey stakeholders in the report that would a-- as key stakeholders in the report. this report would assess how this legislation affected our civil liberties and privacy throughout our federal government, and the department of homeland security is the -- the key civil department in our federal government that develops and implements cybersecurity protocalls for the rest of the -- protocols for the rest of the federal government. it is crucial that they be part of any assessment and work with both the privacy office
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
investment in renewable and energy. give the benefit of the technology got when they were young industry. >> is it the anticipation in the next ten or fifteen years that all of the renewables will be able to catch up in surpass what is currently with oil, gas, and coal. >> over time. >> i have no problem with wind and hydroelectricity and solar. the assumption that we're going take away normal business expense from oil and gas and coal which will slow down the reduction and increase price. the same as the cigarette tax currently in the budget actually said we want to decrease usage by increasing the price. we get rid of revenue. it seems to be the same with oil, gas, and coal. we increase the price at the pump or home heating oil or electricity increase the price of those and try to supplement off to other areas which every economist i've seen deals with energy economy said those technologies probably not for thirty years or more to get close it catching up. 9 percent of the portfolio we supplement the other 1eu89%. >> i don't think the proposal on oil and gas industry work. i would be h
they needed to replace older security equipment and technology, expand restricted we keyway system ems and place security levers on all doors which allowed teachers to lock tours doors from the inside. you may say that's not expensive. why do you need to spend money? it sure adds up when you really want to secure a door and you want to do it right. so if you have many, many doors so we can help them do these things. and if they wanted to, make sure they harden their facility, that's what the money is for. now, there's a township in new jersey, they used funds to secure perimeter and playground areas by installing security gates at elementary and intermediate schools to create a safer learning environment. the new exterior fences define school boundaries making the schools safer for students. entourier gates were replaced, providing the ability to lock off specific areas of the schools during emergencies. again, it's common sense but when these schools were built, madam president, no one thought about this. everything was open. like the capitol, when i came here, i'm dating myself, a lo
shows in terms of sales volume, and we all know how we're using our technology more and more every day for our personal lives and how we defend on it. for example, the national shooting sports foundation surveyed owners of modern sporting rifles in 2010 and found that 10% of them, 10% of all rifles sold had purchased their firearms at gun shows, whereas 25% had purchased them online. 25%. believe me, i understand the political stakes for my colleagues and i sympathize. i have been there. i understand it. and comes from states like west virginia, and no state has a higher regard for the second amendment rights to bear arms than my state. in fact, on the great seal of the state of west virginia, the preamble is montani sember liberai. in latin, that means mountaineers are always free. you know how we feel. one of the review states that became a state during the civil war, broke away from virginia at that time. but west virginians are also guided by a little common sense. i have said this. in west virginia, we know what nonsense is, we know what common sense is, and now we know what gun s
to do, but ideally that money would go more towards technology and manpower. >> you would like flexibility? >> we would like flexibility. >> and the boston public health commission says the number of people injured in last week's blast is up to 264, those people have been treated in 26 area hospitals. we're back after the break. stay with us. ♪ very, very excited about that and very proud of that. >>beltway politics from inside the loop. >>we tackle the big issues here in our nation's capital, around the country and around the globe. >>dc columnist and four time emmy winner bill press opens current's morning news block. >>we'll do our best to carry the flag from 6 to 9 every morning. this show is about analyzing criticizing, and holding policy to the fire. are you encouraged by what you heard the president say the other night? is this personal or is it political? a lot of my work happens by doing the things that i am given to doing anyway. staying in tough with everything that is going on politically and putting my own nuance on it. not only does senator rubio just care
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9